We’ve settled into the consistent fishing that the Upper Deschutes provides through the summer, and there will be good opportunity to find Brookies, Native Rainbows, and Whitefish until the upper reaches of the Deschutes close in September. The stretch of water between Little Lava and Crane Prairie offers consistent, cool flows through the summer, and is the best area to focus angling efforts. The water is a little low this year, and low lake levels mean there is no consistent spill from Little Lava into the river channel. There is still plenty of water to fish, and we’ve been enjoying warm afternoons filled with dry flies, light rods, and aggressive fish in the beautiful setting of the Oregon Cascades. While we tend to fish a lot of small water with a 3 wt and attractor dries, there are plenty of deeper holes and plenty of structure throughout the upper river that hold larger Brookies and Rainbows. The dry dropper approach typically finds the more wary fish that aren’t always looking towards the surface while keeping things nice and light.

Suggested Dries: Black or Tan Elk Hair Caddis #14-18, Cutter’s Caddis #14-18, Black or Tan Foam Caddis #14-18, Purple Haze #14-18, Tilt Wing PMD #14-18, Parachute PMD #14-18, Tilt Wing Mahogany #14-16, Black Stimulator #14-16, Parachute Adams #14-18, CDC Flying Ant #14-16, Black or Cinnamon Foam Ant #14-16

Suggested Nymphs: Red or Black Copper John #14-18, Red or Black Lightning Bug #14-18, Red or Black Two Bit Hooker #16-20, Guide’s Choice Hare’s Ear #14-18, FB Pheasant Tail #14-18, Micro Mayfly #16-20, Pearl or Red Rainbow Warrior #16-20, Black or Purple Zebra Midge #16-20, Olive Soft Hackle #14-18, Soft Hackle Hare’s Ear #14-18

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Crooked River Update 7/12/19