The Upper D is fishing well, especially in the upper stretches where the water is cooler and small. There are plenty of small-mid sized fish that will aggressively take a terrestrial or attractor pattern throughout the day. Fishing a dry dropper with a Mayfly nymph in the #14-18 range will maximize chances of finding fish and may entice the occasional larger fish that is more wary of coming to the surface. Small streamers are also a great option when searching for large fish, and when presented properly can get into areas of heavy cover which hold fish that don’t see many artificial flies. Caddis will continue to become more prolific as the weather warms, and fish will be looking at terrestrials until the weather cools in the Fall.

Suggested Dries: Elk Hair Caddis #14-18, Purple Haze #16-18, Parachute Adams #16-18, Tilt Wing Mahogany #16-18, Tilt Wing PMD #16-18, Parachute PMD #16-18, Royal Wulff #14-18, Humpy #14-18, X Caddis #14-16, Peacock Chubby Chernobyl #14-16, Paracricket #14-16, CDC Flying Ant #16, Black or Cinnamon Foam Ant #16

Suggested Nymphs: BH Hare’s Ear #14-18, BH Pheasant Tail #14-18, Hare’s Ear or Olive Anato-May #14-18, Copper Microstone #14-16, Two Bit Hooker #16-18, Micro Mayfly #16-18, Sparkle Pupa #14-18, Nitro Caddis #14-18

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