The hot summer days of August typically result in a lull in the fishing for the Lower Deschutes. The cool spring and early summer we’ve had has certainly helped alleviate the impact of the hot days, but the consistency of finding fish in the Lower River has dropped off slightly in the past couple of weeks. We are still having plenty of great days, and the cool hours of the morning have fished well. The hot afternoons can be a little tougher, but those with a little determination and the right mindset can still find plenty of fish to keep things interesting. The evening remains the best time to fish dries, and we are still seeing a variety of Caddis bring fish to the surface during the last hour or two of the day. Areas that offer deep water downstream of fast riffles and gravel bars are ideal holding areas this time of year.

It’s still a little early to be thinking about Steelhead in the Warm Springs area, but the fish are on their way up and being caught with relative consistency from Maupin down to the mouth. Fish counts are similar to those we saw last year, and warming water conditions should be considered heavily so we can protect the fish that are making it back. It is good to carry a thermometer, or to only fish through the mornings when the water is at its coolest.

Suggested Dries: X Caddis #14-18, Tan Cutters Caddis #14-18, Outrigger Caddis #14-18, Edible Emerger #14-18, Tan Elk Hair Caddis #14-18, Tilt Wing PMD #16-18, Parachute PMD #16-18, Parachute Adams #16-18, Purple Haze #14-18

Suggested Nymphs: Guide’s Choice Hare’s Ear #16-18, Brown Micro Mayfly #16-20, Black or Red Two Bit Hooker #16-20, Jigged Tungsten HE #14-16, Jigged CDC Pheasant Tail #14-16, Bullet Quill #16-18, Duracell Jig #16, Perdigon #14-18, Zika Jig #16-20, Frenchie #14-18, Tan Sparkle Pupa #16-18, Nitro Caddis #16-18, Olive or HE Soft Hackle #14-18, Black or Red Zebra Midge #16-20

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East Lake Update 8/19/19