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March 07 . 14

Lower Deschutes

    The Lower Deschutes water level is currently on the high side. If you venture out there look to fish close in near the banks. Hatches of Bwo's, Midges, and Caddis are to be expected. Nymphing a stonefly nymph with a mayfly dropper should do the job. Stonefly's should be moving around more and more as time progresses towards the big hatch. Were getting so close to game time on the Lower D. March Browns and Big Bugs are at the doorstep. :)
posted by FFO Crew
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February 25 . 14

Lower Deschutes Report

   The Lower Deschutes is running a little higher than normal and possibly a little off color. As bad as this is for fishing, this also helps for what is to come. Water was much needed everywhere. The lower can fish decent this time of year for trout. Nymphng stonefly nymphs and mayfly droppers can produce. Bwo's are coming off during the day which can make for some good dry fly fishing. March Browns and the BIG BUG are at are not too far off. It won't be long before were back to fishing the upper section of the Lower Deschutes.
posted by FFO Crew
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January 30 . 14

Lower Deschutes Report

    Trout fishing and bug activity on the Lower Deschutes hasn't been bad especially when weather is getting in the 50's. Bwo's and midges will come off all winter long on the Lower D. Focus on back eddies and slower riffles. The Maupin area can have great trout fishing and a lot of time is overlooked. Going upstream of Maupin or Locked gate is a great place to start. Enjoy the nice weather while it still lasts!
posted by FFO Crew
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January 14 . 14
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Sneaking in the first STEEL of 2014

    At the beginging of every new year, fishing for Steelhead within the first week is almost a challenge to see if you can manage to start things off with a tug. Even if it's New Year's day and your pulling over for your buddy to throw up on the way to river because of the nasty lingering hangover. Yes this is a true story, however, this year was a little different.
    A few fishing buddy's and I set out to hit the Lower D January 2nd thinking to ourselves that we are  late to the party, won't catch shit, but that it will be a great time. Fishing the Maupin area and venturing down the access road was the game plan. With no expectations, we roll up to the first run of the day and Jordan hooks up within the first few minutes. After a fairly epic battle for this time of year for a steelhead, we land the buck and watch him swim away. At this point wether we see another or not we all didn't care. Coming around every turn on the access road to not see another car in a pull out is quite the site. We all know how ridiculously busy that section of the river gets in September through October. After Jordan's fish, we fish fairly hard for the next few hours and decide to head down river to Beavertail. Stepping into a run near Beavertail, it happens! The line starts peeling and my heart starts pounding like a drum. After jumping and some hard runs, I finally get a hold of him. In shock after such a battle for January, I was astonished by the brightness and the condition of the fish. Wiggling out of my hands he entered back into the abyss and swam away hard with a good tail slap. I always love when a fish gives you the tail kiss. It's insane how determined Steelheard are! They endure so many conditions and struggles throughout their lifespan and we should appreciate their existence and continue to be gentle with these fish. Satisfied was just an understatement of how I felt after that fish. Before I could reenact what just happened, Andy hooks up. After another epic battle Andy released the third beautiful wild fish of the day. Again bright and in excellent condition. What more could you ask for! First fishing trip of the year, no people around, everyone landed one swinging, and the fish were all unbelievably bright and spunky for this time of year. Let 2014 be epic and I wish tight lines for everyone!
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January 07 . 14

New Year on the Lower

   It's not over for fishing on the Lower Deschutes. The Maupin area consists of some great water for both Trout and Steelhead. January is late in the season for summer steelhead however, there are surely still some fish trickling into the Lower D. The fish aren't all rotten tomatoes yet.  The water conditions on the Lower have stayed consistent along with this surprisingly warm weather. Crowds down there are practically non-existent giving you first choice on water. We sure can't say that in September.
posted by FFO Crew
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December 19 . 13
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Last Call

It's just about time to call it a season on the Deschutes and start thinking about steel in coastal streams.  The upper reaches of the Lower Deschutes closes to all fishing at the end of the year, so now is the time to get in your last kicks.  There are still steelhead on the move, including some very nice late arriving wild fish.  Flows and water clarity are ideal for swinging flies.  I got home last night from the Trout Creek to Harpham stretch and we found willing fish all three days.  Waterfowl hunting is excellent right now too, due to the recent cold weather.  Upland birds, on the other hand, have been hard to come by.  Enjoy!
posted by Neal Burrell
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December 01 . 13
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Not over yet!

The Deschutes steelhead season isn't quite over yet.  I just got home from a three day float and the fishing was decent.  Fish are still moving around and there are quite a few late arriving wild fish plus strays from other river systems to keep you busy....probably Idaho fish that were originally bound for the Snake or Clearwater.  River flows are perfect and clarity is the best I've seen it all season--excellent for swinging flies.  No effin' egg patterns necessary.
posted by Neal Burrell
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November 18 . 13

Lower D Is Fishing Good

As of mid-week last week the Lower D had heated up. One of our guides had a five species day including two Steelhead landed (several others "got away"), four Bull Trout (up to 6-plus pounds!), many sturdy Redbands, and the obligatory Whitefish and Butterbellies. It is a egg scene down there now. The spey casters aren't doing nearly as well as indicator nymphing. Anything with an egg: sucking leeches, hothead Stones, egg patterns. They all work. Get it down in the slower water and you'll hook something! Only six weeks left...
posted by FFO Crew
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November 08 . 13
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Late Season Steel

With recent rains, the Deschutes has been rising steadily all week...getting up to winter-like flows.   Don't let that deter you, as the clarity is still very good.  That said, the catching is still tough down there.  I've been averaging a fish or two a day for my boat lately.  Not bad, but not stellar either.  There are definitely fewer people out there now than there was a few weeks ago.  Not a bad time to find some solitude in the canyon and enjoy the little bit of nice weather that we have left this fall.
posted by Neal Burrell
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October 23 . 13
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Update

Word on the street is that fishing is a little slow right now for steelhead.  Blame the full moon, irrigation, or whatever.... just gotta go fishing and see what happens.  We've been scrounging up some very nice fish the last few days, mostly on swung flies.  I've been starting to switch over to light sink tips and flies that have a larger profile.  Fishing upstream of Maupin will hold up well over the next month.  This beautiful weather won't last...time to get out there!
posted by Neal Burrell
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October 14 . 13
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Another steelhead report

Steelhead fishing rolls on.  The days are shorter and the mornings chillier.  Good numbers of fish are in the river from the Mouth up to Warm Springs.  Wild fish have been making up the bulk of the catch this past week...always nice to see.  However, above Trout Creek most of the fish are one-salt hatchery fish that are headed to the Round Butte hatchery.  Swung flies and nymphs are both working--pick your poison.  Irrigation season is coming to an end in Central Oregon.  That means the river will likely spike a little bit this week (probably tomorrow).  It might put a damper on things for a few days, but should get the fish stirred up a bit and things should get back to normal fairly quickly.  The White River has been behaving if you're headed down that far.  Good luck out there.
posted by Neal Burrell
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October 08 . 13

October on the Lower Deschutes

    October on the Lower Deschutes brings fantastic fishing opportunities. Steelhead are spread throughout the entire system and there have been numerous reports of anglers catching Steelhead between Warm Springs and Trout Creek. Due to the crazy rainstorms we had a few weeks back, the White River below Maupin is still spitting out some mud. The good news is anglers are still catching fish below the white. The visibility has improved significantly enough that floating lines and traditionals are producing some action. As water temperatures start dropping fish will start slowing down a little and sink tips and nymphing will be a little more productive. Trout have been fairly active and October Caddis have been seen throughout the river. Patterns to have are: October Caddis, Prince Nymph, Glo Bug, Bwo, Moal Leech, Traditional Steelhead Patterns, and Intruders.
posted by FFO Crew
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September 30 . 13
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Steel

The river shot up quite a bit thanks to some serious rain over the weekend.  Color is off a little bit as well.  Look for flows to stabilize and/or drop fairly quickly.  That said, I've been on the river every day for the last week and today was the best day of the bunch...we had four steelhead to hand by lunch.  Just goes to show, you can't catch a steelhead from the couch.  Decent numbers of fish seem to be in the river, with the best concentrations of fish below Whitehorse.  Wild fish are making up the majority of the catch, with some being rather large.  Enjoy October!
posted by Neal Burrell
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September 29 . 13
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DESCHUTES STEELHEAD REPORT

    Steelhead fishing down on the Lower Deschutes the last two weeks has been a blast! The days of wet wading are behind us and the pleasant fall days are ahead as the trees begin showing their fall colors. Overcast is on the radar for as long as I can see on the weather report which just means swinging all day long.. Early Fall is my favorite time of year to fish for steelhead on the Lower Deschutes. Fish are in and throughout the entire Lower Deschutes. Swinging on dry lines and throwing sink tips will both produce all day long especially in overcast conditions. I have spent quite a bit of time down there and have been seeing some great action. Fish are grabby and are eating just about anything you throw at them. As steelhead fishermen the main objective is to stay confident. Fish flies and use tactics you feel confident with. If you put your time in and stick with it your work will pay off.
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September 19 . 13
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Pine Tree to the Mouth

The time is now.  Steelhead are in the river from the Mouth all the way up to Warm Springs.  I just got home from a 4 day Pine Tree to the Mouth float with an outstanding couple from the Spokane area.  We endured some hurricane like winds, but had a blast anyway.  Jon set up a great camp and kept us fed like kings.  Nikki and Mark both landed their first steelhead ever plus a few more for good measure.  Mark even scored a bonus Chinook at Wagonblast on the last night of the trip.  It seems like the water clarity down low is still a little off, but the fish aren't minding--they can see just fine.  Cool, damp weather is in the forecast...perfect for steelhead fishing.  Cheers.

posted by Neal Burrell
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September 16 . 13
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Warm Springs Float

Floated Warm Springs to Trout Creek this past weekend with our regular Jeld Wen monthly float and had a great day on the river. Nymphing mostly riffle water, the trout fishing was good on very small nymphs. Along with some nice sized trout there was 3 steelhead hooked and one landed! Hope that is a good indicator of the steelhead fishing for this season!
posted by Chris Lundberg
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September 11 . 13
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Trout Report

It's September and the dog days of summer are now behind us.  With cooling air and water temperatures, the trout on the Deschutes are resuming their feeding binge.  Multiple species of caddis, including the big October caddis, are making a strong showing and trout are responding well.  The evening dry fly bite lately has been every bit as good as it was in July.

As we get closer to October, expect catchable numbers of steelhead as far upstream as Trout Creek.
posted by Neal Burrell
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September 05 . 13

Steelhead Update

Steelhead fishing has been consistently good from Macks to the Mouth.  I've been spending a fair amount of time down there over the last couple of weeks.  It does still seem like the biggest concentrations of steelhead are in the lower 15 miles of river, probably due to high numbers of strays dipping in from the Columbia to cool off.  Water clarity has improved greatly after the blow out we saw last week.  Fish counts at Bonneville, The Dalles, and Sherars are all on the low side--very similar to last year's numbers.  Despite all that, we've been finding more than a few willing fish to crush our swung flies.   Floating lines and small traditional steelhead flies have been the top producer.  Mid-day sink tip fishing has been very productive as well....we've been catching fish in the heat of the day while most people are taking a siesta.  See you on the water.
posted by Neal Burrell
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August 11 . 13

Lower D Report

    Trout Fishing this time of year on the Lower Deschutes can be tough. However, there still can be some good fishing. Caddis are still in full force and can make for awesome fishing during the last hour of light. During the day, the redsides will be concentrated in shade under trees or in riffles. Look for heads rising in the foam lines and in eddies. Nymphing caddis pupa's and soft hackles can do some damage. Have tan and olive caddis in 16 to 18's. 5x and 6x tippet is a must for dries.

    The Steelhead Report has been somewhat consistent with a few really good reports coming from some folks. Pine Tree to the Mouth will have your highest concentration of fish. Bonneville fish counts have been increasing. All we need is some more cool temperatures and that should make for some spectacular fishing. Water Temperatures down around the mouth are still a little warm but hopefully that will change with more cool weather. Swinging traditional's and hair wings have been producing in the mornings. Fishing intruders on a sink tip during the day has been slow but you never know when you might hit a pod of fish. So far this year is looking promising!
posted by FFO Crew
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July 28 . 13
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Steelhead Report

    This Last Wednesday I got a chance to hit the lower 10 miles of the Lower Deschutes. After hearing a few reports and watching water temperatures, the best bet was to fish early morning and call it good. Water temperatures in the evening are getting too warm and will cause a lot of stress on fish. The morning temperatures are in the low to mid sixties which is manageable. The good news is shade stays on the water for about 3 hrs. A friend and I had plenty of fishing time during one shade session and managed to find some fish. Dry Line skating and swinging traditional's is the way to go in shade. Once the sun hits the water switch over to a sink tip. There are definitely some steel swimming around in the Lower D right now. Play your cards right and the reward could be chrome! These early fish can be untouchable and are full of piss and vinegar.
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July 25 . 13
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Fire Update and Fishing Report

As of this writing, the entire Lower Deschutes is open to boating and camping.  BLM is advising floaters between Warm Springs and Dant to be aware of continued firefighting efforts in the area as well as hazards created by the recent fires.  On to the fishing report....I was supposed to put in on Tuesday for a 3 day trout trip from Trout Creek to Harpham.  Obviously, the fire forced us to change our plans.  Fortunately, our clients were happy use this opportunity to see a section of river they had never been on and we went ahead and floated from Pine Tree to the Mouth...in search of trout.  Yeah, it almost seems blasphemous to be trout fishing in late July on the lower, lower river.  However, we had a stellar trip!  We fished in uncrowded conditions to unmolested trout that were eager to pounce on a well presented fly.  Caddis dries in the evening worked very well as did various pupa patterns sunk deep during the day. 

We talked to multiple people who had been hooking steelhead, mostly below Lockit.  Seems like the gear guys were doing best, especially in the middle of the day.  They're here!
posted by Neal Burrell
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July 21 . 13
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Here they come!


Here they Come! The Lower 20 miles on the Lower Deschutes is the place to be if you are looking for that early, hot ass steelhead. Yes the numbers are still low, but all it takes is one! Put in your time and the reward could be more than worth it. These early steelhead can be untouchable. Blistering runs and jumps will be the norm if you hook into one. Early morning's are best right now due to water temperatures. By evening time the water temps have been getting in the high 60's to 70ish. That can be bad news for fish. The mortality rate goes up when the temps are that high. Please just be aware of that and keep those beautiful wild fish in the water. There have been a few decent reports already. Like I said it only takes one fish. Go get em!  
posted by FFO Crew
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July 13 . 13
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3 More Days on the River

Not much new to report on the Deschutes.  Mid-day nymphing is producing nice fish in well oxygenated areas.  Caddis hatches in the evenings have provided us with some silly-good dry fly fishing during the last hour of daylight.  As it gets darker, fish tend to get less picky about pattern.  So tie on something that you have a decent chance of seeing as it get dark, like an elk hair caddis with a light colored wing.  Cast to rising fish and set the hook if you see a rise anywhere near where you think your fly might be.  Gotta love July on the D!
 
posted by Neal Burrell
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July 08 . 13
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Sight fishing on the lower Deschutes.

When on the hunt for rising fish be looking in the shadows and underneath the overhanging trees and close to the undercut banks. To a novice, the angler will imminently go to where he or she sees a violent splash just to realize they are keying in on a fingerling sized trout. Instead look for the very relaxed takes where you can see the fish sipping flies off the waters film just as slow and relaxed as you and I would eat popcorn at the movie theater.

posted by Drew Shane
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July 06 . 13
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Um...more caddis

The river has been very good this week.  There has been some nice dry fly fishing courtesy of some most excellent caddis hatches.  I've actually seen better dry fly fishing this last week on the Warm Springs to Trout Creek stretch than I saw at any time during the stonefly hatch...and 90 percent fewer people.  Nymphing has been a good producer as well.  Nice weather is in the forecast--fishing should hold up.
posted by Neal Burrell
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July 01 . 13
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Goodbye Stoneflies hello Caddisflies

With the Salmonfly hatch done the Caddisflies are in full swing with our recent warmer temperatures. This is truly one of the best times of the year to be fishing on the lover Deschutes river.



posted by Drew Shane
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June 29 . 13
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Caddis Time

Well, the rainy, icky weather is finally behind us.  Hot weather has triggered some incredible caddis hatches on the Lower River.  Yesterday we saw some of the best dry fly fishing we've seen since the stonefly hatch.  Fish were found mid-day in shady lies, but the best action came from 7ish until dark--trout were going nuts on the surface.  X-Caddis and the E/C Caddis are two proven patterns down there.  Carry them in sizes 14-18 and don't be afraid to throw a mayfly pattern into the mix if the fish are snubbing the caddis dries.

Steelhead are trickling over the Dalles Dam.  If you must go, focus your efforts from the mouth up to Hot Rocks and try to cover a lot of water.  If you are lucky enough to hook-up, it will likely be a very memorable fish.  Chrome and hot!
posted by Neal Burrell
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Deschutes River

The Deschutes River, Oregon: Arguably one of the most famous rivers in the world, the Deschutes River, Oregon offers tremendous fly fishing opportunities in Read More... its' pursuit to the mighty Columbia River. Beginning deep in the heart of the Oregon Cascades the Deschutes River, Oregon, known as the Upper Deschutes, makes its' way from Little Lava Lake through two famous impoundments, Crane Prairie and Wickiup Reservoirs. Here, the river has created a haven for estuary birds and larger than life Rainbow and Brown Trout. As the Deschutes River, Oregon spills out continuing its journey to the Columbia, the river takes on a new face and meanders through meadows and marshes with a Cascadian backdrop of snow covered volcanic peaks and giant Ponderosa Pines. As the river eventually drops more than 700 feet it carves a canyon through 4000 year old lava flows creating a white water boaters playground. Although the river's pulse is erratic and sometimes downright cardiac, it still hosts good populations of Rainbow and Brown Trout for the adventure angler. As it slows for a breathe of air, the Deschutes River, Oregon quietly glides into the city of Bend. At this point the river gives up more than 90% of its flow into the Central Oregon Irrigation Districts vast canal system. This incredible system creates a stable farming economy and bread basket of crops and turf in an otherwise desolate region. The remaining flow, considered by most to be the Middle Deschutes, continues its trek north through rugged and treacherous canyon country. This stretch offers year round fishing and some of the most prolific desert vistas. Home to Rainbow and Brown Trout, the Middle has very difficult access yet rewards those that venture into her intense beauty. Tiring from its course through the canyon, the Middle rivers' final progression finds its way to Lake Billy Chinook, the last impoundment. This great high desert reservoir, covering 4000 acres, was created in 1964 by the implementation of a hydro electrical dam known as Round Butte. Stretching over 400 feet high and 1500 feet in length this dam swallows up nearly 600,000 acre feet of water that flows in from an area of 7000 square miles. This desert oasis is the embodiment of the Metolious, Crooked, and the Deschutes Rivers. Now, on its final 100 mile leg of the 250 mile journey, the Lower Deschutes is made. This most famous stretch of the Deschutes boasts incredible populations of the west's hardest fighting wild Rainbow Trout, the "Redsides", as well as home to the elusive Summer Steelhead runs. At an average flow of 5500 cfs, the river plows to the Columbia with an intense vertical drop of 1200 feet causing the canyon rim to peer down at you some 2000 feet above. The Deschutes River, Oregon’s shear immensity can certainly overwhelm and inspire anyone who travels her. Known for its fly fishing, the Deschutes River, Oregon is still recognized worldwide as a trophy fishery. Prolific hatches of Salmonflies and Stoneflies kick the season off in May and gradually transition into summer Caddis hatches that some would say "are of biblical proportions!" As cooler autumn temperatures arrive, so do the chrome bullets from the Columbia….Steelhead. The summer Steelhead season begins and the Deschutes canyon changes its mood to a fall spectacle of color. Long shadows and harsh Columbia Gorge winds find their way up the canyon to confront the undaunted steelhead angler. Two handed "Spey Rods" and swung wet flies can produce little heart attacks as these hot fish make their way up the river. As the river and the weather cools these fish continue to respond to the fly. Deep presentations with sinking tips and larger flies will pull these "street thugs" from the bottoms where they lie. The battle ensues through December until the last Alder leaf falls to the surface. This is a river that one can only experience its intensity through a physical journey. It flows through memories of past and present. Anglers who venture into the vast canyons return year after year. Now is your time.

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Lower Deschutes

Today:
A 20 percent chance of rain. Cloudy, with a high near 58. Southwest wind 6 to 10 mph becoming west in the afternoon.

Apr 16
Wednesday
58°
44°
Cloudy
Winds: 10 mph
Humidity: 62%
Dew Point: 32°
Chance Precip: 20%
Apr 17
Thursday
62°
44°
Mostly Cloudy
Winds: 9 mph
Humidity: 84%
Dew Point: 38°
Chance Precip: 4%
Apr 18
Friday
60°
42°
Partly Cloudy
Winds: 9 mph
Humidity: 83%
Dew Point: 34°
Chance Precip: 25%
Apr 19
Saturday
71°
39°
Partly Cloudy
Winds: 5 mph
Humidity: 78%
Dew Point: 26°
Chance Precip: 7%
Apr 20
Sunday
72°
32°
Partly Cloudy
Winds: 10 mph
Humidity: 82%
Dew Point: 36°
Chance Precip: 9%

Lower Deschutes

Blue-Winged Olive

Pheasant Tail Nymph 16-20 Afternoon
Flashback Pheasant Tail Nymph 16-18 Afternoon
Tailwater Tiny Olive 18-20 Afternoon
Para BWO 16-18 Afternoon
Hi Vis Para BWO 16-18 Afternoon
Spun Dun Beatis 16-18 Afternoon

Slate-Winged Olive

Olive Hare's Ear Nymph 10-14 Afternoon
Olive Pheasant Tail Nymph 10-14 Afternoon
Copper John Green Nymph 10-14 Afternoon
Olive Sparkle Dun 10-14 Afternoon
Western Green Drake 10-14 Afternoon
Olive Haze 10-14 Afternoon

Green Drake

Poxyback Green Drake Nymph 10 Afternoon
Olive Hare's Ear Nymph 10-12 Afternoon
Hunchback Green Drake Nymph 10-12 Afternoon
Green Drake Wulff 10-12 Afternoon
Trina's Carnage Drake 10-12 Afternoon

Pale Morning Dun

Pheasant Tail Nymph 16-18 Aternoon
Trina's Bubbleback Nymph 16-18 Aternoon
Copper John Nymph 16-18 Aternoon
Parachute PMD 14-16 Aternoon
Para Wulff PMD 14-16 Aternoon
High Vis Para PMD 14-16 Aternoon

Pale Evening Dun

Copper John Nymph 12-14 Evening
Hare's Ear Nymph 12-14 Evening
Pheasant Tail Nymph 12-14 Evening
Parachute Adams 12-14 Evening
Parachute PMD 12-14 Evening
Lite Cahill 12-14 Evening

Mahogany Dun

Copper John Nymph 14 Afternoon
Hare's Ear Nymph 14 Afternoon
Pheasant Tail Nymph 14 Afternoon
Compara Dun 14 Afternoon
Compara Dun Purple 14 Afternoon
Parachute Pheasant Tail 14 Afternoon

March Brown

Pheasant Tail Nymph 12-14 Afternoon
Hare's Ear Nymph 12-14 Afternoon
Copper John Nymph 12-14 Afternoon
Purple Haze 12-14 Afternoon
Cripple 12-14 Afternoon
Parachute Adams 12-14 Afternoon

October Caddis

Anderson Bird of Prey (Pupa) 8-10 Afternoon
Super Pupa Amber 8-10 Afternoon
Stimulator Orange 8-10 Afternoon
Elk Hair Caddis Orange 8-10 Afternoon

Cased Caddis

Sparkle Pupa 14-20 Evening
Peeking Caddis (Pupa) 14-20 Evening
Silvey's Beadhead Pupa 14-20 Evening
X-Caddis 14-20 Evening
Outrigger Caddis 14-20 Evening
Elk Hair Caddis 14-20 Evening

Net-builder Caddis

Hair's Ear (Larva) 12-16 Morning /
Evening
Dubbed Caddis (Larva) 12-16 Morning /
Evening
Serendipy (Larva) 12-16 Morning /
Evening
Deep Sparkle Pupa 12-16 Morning /
Evening
Silvey's Beadhead Pupa 12-16 Morning /
Evening
Edible Emerger (Pupa) 12-16 Morning /
Evening
Elk Hair Caddis 12-16 Morning /
Evening
Swisher's Dancing Caddis 12-16 Evening
PT Caddis 12-16 Evening

Rock Worm Caddis

Serendipity (Larva) 14-16 Morning /
Evening
Caddis Larva 14-16 Morning /
Evening
Brassie (Larva) 14-16 Morning /
Evening
Silvey's Beadhead Pupa 14-16 Morning /
Evening
Edible Emerger (Pupa) 14-16 Afternoon /
Evening
Sparkle Pupa 14-16 Afternoon /
Evening
Elk Hair Caddis 14-16 Afternoon /
Evening
X-Caddis 14-16 Afternoon /
Evening
Outrigger Caddis 14-16 Afternoon /
Evening

Salmonfly

Lex's Improved RL Stone Black (Nymph) 4-6 Morning /
Afternoon
Tung Trout Retriever Black (Nymph) 4-6 Morning /
Afternoon
Kauffman's Stone Black (Nymph) 4-6 Morning /
Afternoon
Rouge Foam Orange 4-6 Afternoon /
Evening
Stimulator Orange 4-6 Afternoon /
Evening
Clark's Stonefly 6 Afternoon /
Evening

Golden Stonefly

Lex's Improved RL Stonefly (Nymph) 6-10 Morning /
Afternoon
Rubber Legs Golden (Nymph) 6-10 Morning /
Afternoon
Kauffman's Stonefly (Nymph) 6-10 Morning /
Afternoon
Golden (Nymph) 6-10 Morning /
Afternoon
Norm Wood's Special 6-8 Afternoon /
Evening
Chubby Chernobyl Golden 8-10 Afternoon /
Evening
Stimulator Golden 6-10 Afternoon /
Evening

Yellow Sally Stonefly

Kyle's Little Yellow Sally (Nymph) 12-14 Afternoon /
Evening
Pyscho Prince (Nymph) 12-14 Afternoon /
Evening
Little Yellow Solan (Nymph) 12-14 Afternoon /
Evening
Slow Water Sally 14 Afternoon /
Evening
Yellow Stimulaor 12-14 Afternoon /
Evening
Trina's Para Sally 12-14 Afternoon /
Evening

Winter Black Stonefly

Prince Nymph 14-16 Afternoon
Dark Lord (Nymph) 14-16 Afternoon
Trina's Copper Micro Stone Black (Nymph) 14-16 Afternoon
Black Parachute 14-16 Afternoon
Stimulator Black 14-16 Afternoon
Elk Hair Caddis Black 14-16 Afternoon

Skwalla Stonefly

Speckled Girdle Bug Brown (Nymph) 8-10 Afternoon
Kauffman's Stone Brown (Nymph) 8-10 Afternoon
Biot Stone Brown (Nymph) 8-10 Afternoon
Stimulator Brown 8-10 Afternoon
Bullethead Skwalla 8-10 Afternoon
Trin'a Carnage Stone Skwalla 8-10 Afternoon

Cranefly

Silvey's Cranefly Larva 14 Afternoon
Serendipity (Larva) 14 Afternoon
Cranefly Larva 12 Afternoon
Idyl's Parachute Cranefly 12-14 Afternoon
Silvey's Cranefit 16 Afternoon
Parachute PMD 12-14 Afternoon

Midge

Tung Zebra Midge (Pupa) 18-22 All Day
Serendipity (Pupa) 18-22 All Day
Rainbow Warrior (Pupa) 18-22 All Day
Griffith's Gnat 18-22 All Day
Renegade 18-22 All Day
Winker's Midge 18-22 All Day

Lower Deschutes

 

LocationGraphsStageFlowTime
Deschutes/Madras7 day30 day120 Day3.16482010:00 pm
Deschutes/Moody7 day30 day120 Day3.24630010:45 pm
Shitike Creek/Warm Springs7 day30 day120 Day4.5112210:45 pm
Warm Springs/Kahneeta7 day30 day120 Day2.0456910:45 pm

Lower Deschutes/Madras 7 Day

 

Lower Deschutes/Madras 30 Day

 

Lower Deschutes/Madras 120 Day

 

Lower Deschutes/Moody 7 Day

 

Lower Deschutes/Moody 30 Day

 

Lower Deschutes/Moody 120 Day

 

Lower Deschutes/Shitike Creek Warm Springs 7 Day

 

Lower Deschutes/Shitike Creek Warm Springs 30 Day

 

Lower Deschutes/Shitike Creek Warm Springs 120 Day

 

Lower Deschutes/Kahneeta Warm Springs 7 Day

 

Lower Deschutes/Kahneeta Warm Springs 30 Day

 

Lower Deschutes/Kahneeta Warm Springs 120 Day