It’s a beautiful time of year to be on the Metolius, and the warming weather should bring an increase in bug activity in the coming weeks. Fishing has been steady, and nymphing has continued to produce fish most consistently. A two fly rig is ideal, leading with a large weighted stonefly or october caddis pattern followed by a smaller mayfly nymph or caddis pupa is one of our preferred set-ups. One of the greatest challenges on the swift clear waters of the Metolius is ensuring that flies are sinking quickly to, and staying in, the point in the water column where most fish feed. Ideally both flies will drift slightly above the bottom through slower, deeper slots. Flourocarbon tippet and the use of weighted flies and splitshot are essential to achieving this goal and ultimately finding fish while nymphing. Taking an active approach and adjusting the depth of the set up for each run will eventually produce fish!

Dry fly fishing has been sporadic, but should improve as the weather continues to warm. We have seen various caddis and mayfly hatches on most days, and while there are typically not the number of bugs needed to bring fish to the surface consistently, a watchful eye will spot an occasional rise of an opportunistic fish. Having a dry fly rod at the ready and casting to these opportunistic fish will provide the best chance for finding a redside on the dry.

Suggested Nymphs: Golden Stone #6-10, Brown Jimmy Legs #6-10, Deep October Pupa #8-10, Red Two Bit Hooker #16-20, BH Pheasant Tail #16-20, Tan or Olive Sparkle Pupa #16-18, Nitro Caddis #16-18

Suggested Dries: Parachute Adams #16-20, Purple Haze #16-20, Tan Elk Hair Caddis #16-20, Hackle Stacker #18-20

 

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