The fishing on the Lower Deschutes continues to be rather challenging. However, if you are persistent, you will have some success throughout the day. The nymphing has been productive as well. Fish have been hanging in the deep, slower moving water. Focus your nymphing there. The fish are hanging there because the water is colder, deeper, and takes less effort to hang out there. However, if a nymph comes in front of their face, they will take advantage of that. The nymphs that have been strong for us are size 22 red two-bit hookers, sz 20-22 red winkers midges, size 22 pheasant tail soft hackle, size 18-20 black rainbow warrior, sz 16-18 caddis pupae and sz 10-12 brown jimmy legs.

If you are determined to fish dry flies, be sure to have a decent variety. Fish may look at these flies one time and then not move for them again. Typically these fish will not move more than a few inches to eat a caddis. Not nearly as opportunistic as when they are eating salmon flies. If they are eating 16s, they are eating 16s. If they are eating size 18s, they are eating 18s. Make sure you have X-caddis is tan and olive (sz 16/18), outrigger caddis (sz 16/18), and spent caddis (sz16/18)

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